Contesting Neutrality Part II: What’s a Radical Health Worker To Do?

“Lincoln Hospital Belongs to the People”
From left to right: Dorothea Tillie, Cleo Silvers (seated), Pablo Guzman (seated), Juan Gonzalez (standing), Andrew Jackson (seated, face partially obscured); others unidentified. Collection of Hiram Maristany.
From Social Medicine Vol 2, No 2 (2007)

Monday October 29th
6:30: Movie ‘Diagnosing Poverty: Building Community’ and light meal
(optional)
7:00 – 9:00: Group discussion

Please RSVP if you plan to attend and for directions to the meeting location: allianceforpeopleshealth@gmail.com

In the context of roll-backs in public health services such as essential health care coverage for refugees, attacks against public sector workers, a crisis access to post-secondary education due to rising tuition costs, and the rapidly escalating cost of living, more than ever working class and marginalized communities struggle to make ends meet and still fall short of the basic requirements for health.  How can we achieve health for all when we’re spending all of our time filling in the gaps and healing the wounds inflicted by the injustice of capitalism?

Taking cue from those health workers standing up for refugee health, and drawing inspiration from students in Quebec, the APH invites you to participate in a discussion of what a progressive health movement looks like.  Who participates in this movement? Who leads it? What kind of organization would it take to fight back?  What are the demands that unite us? What is our vision of health for all?  Ultimately, we ask ourselves, as radical health workers, what can we do together to transform our system and to struggle long-term for social justice?

Recommended reading “Is Capitalism a Disease: The Crisis in US Health” by Richard Levins. If you only have time to read part of the article we recommend you focus on the section Responses to the Crisis on pages 18-23.  If you don’t have time to read any of the article, that’s OK! Please join us for the discussion!

At 6:30 we will show the 30 minute movie “Diagnosing Poverty: Building Community” about Community-Based Health Programs in the Philippines and share a light meal together.
At 7:00 we will begin our discussion

Check out this article: Seize the Hospital to Serve the People and the video interview with Cleo Silvers who was active in the campaign to Seize the Hospital to Serve the People

MORE ON DIAGNOSING POVERTY: BUILDING COMMUNITY: “This is a story of Baby Jessie, a child from an indigenous community in Bukidnon, Philippines who almost died because of government neglect and wrong priorities. A story of ordinary people’s courage to organize and mobilize themselves to overcome poverty and build a healthy society. Produced in cooperation with Intal. Diagnosing Poverty, Building Community is an official selection to the New York International Filipino Film and Video Festival 2005.”

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