Fundraiser For Unist’ot’en Camp!

poster for aph eventFEATURING:  Wet’suwet’en leaders Freda Huson and Dini Toghestiy of the Unist’ot’en Camp; Dene author and scholar Glen Coulthard

PERFORMANCES BY:
Cherlyn Cortes with Noah Walker
Eirene Cloma
The Beast Van Cipher (featuring DubGee, Kimmortal, KA.LIL, Jewelah, Sol Diana, Niki Nice, Jill Laxamana, Kris Blade, and Ayex Bathan)
Purple Hearts Social Club

ART WORK FOR SILENT AUCTION BY:
Bert Monterona, Ethel Farrales, Dini Toghestiy

Entrance by donation (sliding scale $5 – $50)
no one will be turned away for lack of funds

About Unist’ot’en Camp:
unistotencamp.com/
https://www.facebook.com/unistoten

The Unist’ot’en Camp is a resistance community whose purpose is to protect sovereign Wet’suwet’en territory from several proposed pipelines from the Tar Sands Gigaproject and shale gas from Hydraulic Fracturing Projects in the Peace River Region.

The camp is located at the shore of the Wedzin Kwah and mouth of the Gosnell Creek. These are all tributary to the Skeena, Bulkley, and Babine Rivers. The proposed pipelines from Enbridge Northern Gateway and Pacific Trails both seek to cross the rivers at the exact point where the resistance camp is built on the Unis’tot’en Territory of Talbits Kwah.

The Unist’ot’en (C’ihlts’ehkhyu / Big Frog Clan) along with other strong uncompromising allies will stop this destructive path, for the future generations, for the biodiversity, and for solidarity with our neighbours living amidst the heavy impacts in the Tar Sands Affected areas in Northern Alberta, and regions heavily affected by Fracking Natural Gas and Shale Oil, as well as communities impacted by Refineries, Pipelines, and Fuel Terminals and Port Expansions.

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THE PEOPLE’S health series

aph_healthseries_V5The Alliance for People’s Health presents:

THE PEOPLE’S health series

A series of FREE workshops to build skills and knowledge around collective health and well-being

Pre-registration Required.  All workshops 1pm-4pm.
Childcare available. Snacks provided.
For more information contact:
allianceforpeopleshealth@gmail.com
604.312.5529
439 Dunlevy Avenue, Vancouver BC

April 6: The People’s History:  This interactive workshop will explore the roots of our personal health histories, as it relates to taking care of our health in the context of our current situation and the communities which we are part of.

APR 27: PATIENT’S RIGHTS: Taking Control of our Health Navigating the current healthcare system as patients can be intimidating and confusing. Join us as we examine patients’ rights and how we, as individuals and communities, can take control of our health and our health care.

MAY 25: Stress & Anxiety Share tips on how to manage and cope with stress and anxiety in your life through learning relaxation techniques and other methods. Discuss what are the roots of our stress and anxiety and what we share in common. Talk about what we can change as individuals and what we can change through collective action.

JUN 15: DENTAL CARE IS A HUMAN RIGHT! Learn about the basics of taking care of your teeth and how to take care for the teeth of the children in your family. Discuss as a group how the lack of access to dental care impacts our communities

International Women’s Day 2013

iwd poster new

Women at the Forefront of Emancipation: Resisting Structural Violence and Exploitation!

Statement by the International Women’s Day Organizing Committee 2013

On March 8th International Women’s Day we raise our fists in solidarity with women struggling for emancipation and we stand united in defense of women’s rights, for genuine liberation for all women.

Women resist colonial occupation!
Today we rally on unceded Coast Salish territory; the traditional territories of the Squamish, Musqueam and Tsleil-Waututh peoples. Indigenous women bear a great burden of colonial occupation and yet across the globe it is Indigenous women who keep the fires of resistance burning in the face of displacement, ethnic cleansing, and genocidal attacks on Indigenous culture, history and traditions.

Indigenous women have never been idle! Palestinian women assert their right to return to the lands from which they were expelled by the Israeli colonial settler state. In India, Adivasi women struggle to protect their ancestral territories despite extreme state violence.

Women resist imperialist plunder of the land and natural resources!
Women lead pivotal struggles for environmental and economic justice in opposition to mining and extractive industries, tar sands, fracking fields, oil and gas pipelines, mono-crop agribusiness, and imperialist military aggression which leads to the destruction and poisoning of the earth.

Former Filipina political prisoner Angie Ipong spent 6 years in prison for joining peasant and Indigenous communities in their land struggles. Freda Huson and women of the Unist’ot’en clan of the Wet’suwet’en are defying pipelines and development aggression on their territories. Wahu Kaara and millions of women across Africa are fighting displacement, development aggression and colonial debt exploitation. These brave women inspire us to protect the Earth and our future generations!

Women resist capitalist exploitation!
Women’s reproductive labour continues to form the basis of capitalist profit as women provide privatized labour in the home and are segregated into ‘women’s work’ such as teaching, nursing, food service, and household management. Women’s work is devalued, and despite decades of struggle, women in Canada continue to be paid only 70% or less of what men earn. In Canada women comprise the vast majority of migrant workers from Asia, forced to migrate by neoliberal economic policies, providing deskilled and cheap labour, privatized health care, and modern-day domestic slavery to the Canadian middle and upper classes.

Migrant women in Canada face a triple-burden of racism, exploitation, and patriarchal violence, and yet women are on the frontlines of struggles against austerity and in defense of public services such as healthcare, daycare and public education. Migrant, immigrant and undocumented women workers,
often excluded from the mainstream union movement, defend and assert their rights through community organizations against great odds.

Women resist patriarchal violence!
There are over 600 missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. For decades women’s organizations have known that the police are integrated in a patriarchal justice system which fails to address violence against women, and in fact, forms a part of the problem. Prostitution, trafficking, and the sexual commodification of women is exploitation and violence against women for the purposes of capitalist accumulation, colonial control, and patriarchal power. It is time to decriminalize women in the sex trade and demand an end to the buying and selling of women! Male violence in the family, including in social justice movements, reinforces patriarchy and gives men individual power over women. It is time to hold men accountable for their sexist attacks against women.

We fight for all women to be free from male violence and sexual exploitation. We stand in solidarity with women who resist religious institutions, ideologies, and practices that suppress and govern women’s lives in all aspects: political, economic, and social limitations placed on women by reactionary theocratic regimes. Hands off women’s bodies and lives!

In India tens of thousands took to the streets in militant protests following the rape of women on a public bus, women political prisoners in Iran recently went on hunger strike to resist torture and degrading and inhumane conditions imposed by the Islamic regime, and in Canada Indigenous women lead the struggle for justice for their murdered and missing sisters, daughters, mothers and aunties.

Women Rising for Emancipation and Justice!
Women around the world are at the forefront of struggles for emancipation that ultimately seek to end capitalism, patriarchy, exploitation, and greed. We struggle to build a society based on collaboration, cooperation, self-determination, the fulfillment of human potential, and the survival of our planet.

  • We stand in solidarity with all women who struggle for emancipation!
  • Hands off women’s bodies and women’s lives!
  • Justice for all missing and murdered women!
  • Resist the plunder of our lands!
  • Long Live International Solidarity!

Host organizations:
ILPS-Canada
Iranian Left Alliance-Vancouver
Alliance for People’s Health
Canada Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights
Iranian Centre for Peace, Freedom and Social Justice
Migrante BC
International Federation of Iranian Refugees and Immigrants (IFIRI)

Contesting Neutrality Part II: What’s a Radical Health Worker To Do?

“Lincoln Hospital Belongs to the People”
From left to right: Dorothea Tillie, Cleo Silvers (seated), Pablo Guzman (seated), Juan Gonzalez (standing), Andrew Jackson (seated, face partially obscured); others unidentified. Collection of Hiram Maristany.
From Social Medicine Vol 2, No 2 (2007)

Monday October 29th
6:30: Movie ‘Diagnosing Poverty: Building Community’ and light meal
(optional)
7:00 – 9:00: Group discussion

Please RSVP if you plan to attend and for directions to the meeting location: allianceforpeopleshealth@gmail.com

In the context of roll-backs in public health services such as essential health care coverage for refugees, attacks against public sector workers, a crisis access to post-secondary education due to rising tuition costs, and the rapidly escalating cost of living, more than ever working class and marginalized communities struggle to make ends meet and still fall short of the basic requirements for health.  How can we achieve health for all when we’re spending all of our time filling in the gaps and healing the wounds inflicted by the injustice of capitalism?

Taking cue from those health workers standing up for refugee health, and drawing inspiration from students in Quebec, the APH invites you to participate in a discussion of what a progressive health movement looks like.  Who participates in this movement? Who leads it? What kind of organization would it take to fight back?  What are the demands that unite us? What is our vision of health for all?  Ultimately, we ask ourselves, as radical health workers, what can we do together to transform our system and to struggle long-term for social justice?

Recommended reading “Is Capitalism a Disease: The Crisis in US Health” by Richard Levins. If you only have time to read part of the article we recommend you focus on the section Responses to the Crisis on pages 18-23.  If you don’t have time to read any of the article, that’s OK! Please join us for the discussion!

At 6:30 we will show the 30 minute movie “Diagnosing Poverty: Building Community” about Community-Based Health Programs in the Philippines and share a light meal together.
At 7:00 we will begin our discussion

Check out this article: Seize the Hospital to Serve the People and the video interview with Cleo Silvers who was active in the campaign to Seize the Hospital to Serve the People

MORE ON DIAGNOSING POVERTY: BUILDING COMMUNITY: “This is a story of Baby Jessie, a child from an indigenous community in Bukidnon, Philippines who almost died because of government neglect and wrong priorities. A story of ordinary people’s courage to organize and mobilize themselves to overcome poverty and build a healthy society. Produced in cooperation with Intal. Diagnosing Poverty, Building Community is an official selection to the New York International Filipino Film and Video Festival 2005.”

Social Determinants of Health: What is to be Done? An Open Study & Discussion with the Alliance for People`s Health

Monday May 21st 6:30 – 8:30 p.m.
Kiwassa Neighbourhood House @ 2425 Oxford Street, Vancouver
R.S.V.P. encouraged – email allianceforpeopleshealth@gmail.com

It has been 167 years since Frederich Engels published The Condition of the Working Class in England, identifying unjust social conditions as the leading cause of disease and injury amongst the English working class.  In 1978 delegates from over 120 countries to the International Conference on Primary Health Care in Alma Ata, USSR, re-affirmed the connection between social (in)justice and health.  In 2005 the World Health Organization struck the Commission on the Social Determinants of Health led by Sir Michael Marmot, a leading academic in the field of health inequities, and in 2008 this same commission published a `ground-breaking`report entitled “Closing the gap in a generation : health equity through action on the social determinants of health“.

Despite this sustained and growing interest in the connections between wealth inequities and health inequities, what is being done at the national and international level to address this connection?  What strategies are the WHO and other global institutions putting forward to address social justice?   What are some of the alternative strategies being adopted in countries where vibrant movements for social justice exist?  What can we learn from these movements? How is the health sector involved in such struggles?

Anne-Emanuelle Birn suggests in her article Making it Politic(al): Closing the Gap in a Generation: Health Equity through Action on the Social Determinants of Health that revolutionary redistribution of wealth and power is the way to address health inequities through concrete action towards social justice.

http://www.socialmedicine.info/index.php/socialmedicine/article/view/365/719

Join members and organizers of the Alliance for People`s Health for a study and discussion of Anne-Emanuelle Birn`s article and the contributions we can make locally through the Alliance for People`s Health.
We look forward to meeting you!

For more information, contact us at allianceforpeopleshealth@gmail.com

Women Be Brave, Stand on the Side of Justice!

Today as we rally to celebrate March 8th International Women’s Day, the Alliance for People’s Health salutes the brave and tireless leadership of women at the forefront of liberation movements struggling against US and Canadian-led imperialism across the globe.

Now more than ever it is urgent that we declare our opposition to imperialist globalization; that we decry capitalism as a corrupt and fundamentally unjust system.  It is imperative that we join the progressive forces of the world in commanding a serious consideration of socialism as a viable and a necessary solution.

As oppressed and exploited women, we know that economic exploitation and capitalist patriarchy underpins the crisis women face today.  Capitalism promotes patriarchal policies and practices, thriving on the cheap labour of women.  In Canada women comprise the vast majority of migrant workers from Asia, forced to migrate by neoliberal economic policies increasing the global wealth divide between the imperial north and the global south.  Canadian migrant women form a source of cheap labour, often providing privatized health care and modern-day domestic slavery to the Canadian middle and upper classes.  Migrant women in Canada face a double-burden of racist and profit-driven state and corporate practices designed to extract maximum profits from marginalized women.

Women’s reproductive labour continues to form the basis of capitalist profits. After a life-time of work in the home and raising children and caring for our families, the only compensation working class women receive for our labour are the occasional flowers and chocolates on Mother’s Day.  Are flowers and chocolate enough to compensate for a life-time of struggle?

On top of providing privatized labour in the home, women continue to be segregated into ‘women’s work’, teaching, nursing, preparing food, serving, and managing households.  Our work is devalued, and despite decades of struggle, women in Canada continue to be paid only 70% of what our male counterparts earn.

Our daily lived experiences speak to our economic situation under capitalism:

  • The majority of those who live in poverty in Canada are women and children: one in seven women in Canada lives under the poverty line.
  • Given our role as the providers of under and un-paid reproductive labour, women are far more reliant upon government services, and more deeply impacted by the escalating government cutbacks and slashing of public services such as health care, education, community-based services, childcare, and welfare.  Upwards of 60% of single mother families will be reliant upon welfare at some point.
  • Women are often segregated into public sector jobs such as teaching and nursing, and therefor face a double-impact of privatization and neoliberal globalization. As the conditions of our work continue to worsen, and our relative pay continues to drop, and our jobs are contracted out and privatized, we have fewer social services to fill the gaps.
  • And in the ultimate irony, as women we bear the greatest brunt of the health impacts of poverty, suffering from greater rates of many chronic and infectious diseases, depression, anxiety, and increasing social isolation.

As our daily lives are dominated by capitalism’s need for profits, our communities are increasingly being destroyed.  Environmental injustice abounds: from tar sands, oil pipelines, and mining projects that plunder indigenous territories, to the ever-escalating imperialist drive to wars of aggression, women are the most deeply impacted by imperialist globalization.

The Way Forward:   We are approaching a turning point in history.  As the global Occupy Movement has demonstrated, increasingly people are fed up with the fundamental injustices of capitalist economics!

We can no longer accept an unceasing drive for profits as the fundamental organizing principle of our society.  We must continue to speak out about the experiences of and consequences of capitalism in our lives, and yet we must start to take the necessary steps to build a viable solution to capitalism.

It is not enough to increase women’s access to jobs, higher wages, or pay equity with working class men – we must reject our exploitation as workers!

It is not enough to increase women’s access to capital through such NGO and finance schemes as micro-credit – we must reject our exploitation as producers!  There is no room for the private sector and patriarchal corporations in our future!

It is not enough to talk about policy change at the governmental level, as history shows us that what we fight for today, without concrete structural and fundamental economic change, we will be fighting for tomorrow – we must struggle towards a world beyond partial solutions!

It is time for women to rise up against imperialist wars of aggression, profiteering, and economic exploitation!

From Palestine, to the Philippines, to the unceded Coast Salish territory upon which we stand today, women are at the forefront of liberation struggles that ultimately seek to oust capitalism and replace it with collaboration, cooperation, and a society that values health, the fulfillment of human potential, and the survival of our planet.

Resources:

Alliance for People’s Health: https://aphvan.wordpress.com

International Women’s Alliance: http://internationalwomensalliance.wordpress.com/

International League of People’s Struggle – Canada: http://ilps-canada.ca/

Women’s Poverty in Canada: http://www.criaw-icref.ca/WomenAndPoverty

Asian rural women speak out: Rights, empowerment and liberation: http://iboninternational.org/resources/pages/EDM/67/162